General Customs Commercial Invoice Template

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Download the general customs invoice template to use when importing goods into NAFTA countries. It lets you identify and describe the goods, their price, origin, and other information customs needs to let your shipment through. The form also lets customs assess the proper duty on the goods, and let the exporter indicate whether the goods should enjoy preferential duty treatment.

How to Make in Adobe PDF and Microsoft Word

Step 1 – Download in Adobe PDF (.pdf) and Microsoft Word (.doc).

Step 2 – List each good you are shipping in the left column. Describe their amount, number, or weight, and include units if necessary, such as rolls or cartridges, so customs can understand the proper amount.

Step 3 – Enter the tariff code for each good, which you can find using the US International Trade Commission database.

Step 4 – The preference criterion should be A if the goods were wholly produced or obtained in North America, B if mostly produced in North America, C if no non-originating materials were used in the goods’ production, or D if the goods are disassembled, unassembled, or incomplete. See the Harmonized Tariff Schedule for further instructions.

Step 5 – Enter “Yes” under Producer if the party certifying the form is the same party that produced the goods. If the exporter is not the producer, enter “No” here and state why you know the goods came from the origin country claimed on the form, e.g., because the producer provided written certification they did.

Step 6 – If the rule of origin calls for a regional value qualification and if the net cost method is used rather than using the transaction value method, then enter “NC” in the Net Cost column. In all other cases, enter “NO.”

Step 7 – Goods originating in North America require “US,” “CA,” or “MX” in the country of origin field. Use “JT” if the goods were jointly produced in the US and Mexico.

How to Make in Microsoft Excel

Step 1 – Download in Microsoft Excel (.xls).

Step 2 – Write the contact information for the exporter, which should be the same party completing the certificate, along with the tax ID number.

Step 3 – Identify the blanket period if the certificate covers multiple shipments of identical goods.

Step 4 – Enter the information for the company that produced the goods, even if it’s the same as the exporter. Then in the field to the right, enter the contact information for the importer.

Step 5 – Under Description of Goods, list each good you are shipping and describe the amount, number, or weight, including any terminology customs would need to identify the goods and their value.

Step 6 – Enter the tariff code for each good, which you can find using the US International Trade Commission database.

Step 7 – The preference criterion should be A if the goods were wholly produced or obtained in North America, B if mostly produced in North America, C if no non-originating materials were used in the goods’ production, andor D if the goods are disassembled, unassembled, or incomplete. See the Harmonized Tariff Schedule for further instructions.

Step 8 – Enter “Yes” under Producer if the party certifying the form is the same party that produced the goods. If the exporter is not the producer, enter “No” here and state why you know the goods came from the origin country claimed on the form, e.g., because the producer provided written certification they did.

Step 9 – If the rule of origin calls for a regional value qualification and if the net cost method is used rather than using the transaction value method, then enter “NC” in the Net Cost column. In all other cases, enter “NO.”

Step 10 – Goods originating in North America require “US,” “CA,” or “MX” in the country of origin field. Use “JT” if the goods were jointly produced in the US and Mexico.